Tropical Diaspora #1

by Various

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    The Tree of Forgetfulness and the Door of No Return

    We are very happy to announce our first compilation on vinyl coming out this autumn. The Volume 1 introduces many independent bands and artists with strong social messages and songs that make people think and dance.

    This socially responsible dancefloor compilation starts with the words of Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, the shaman and spokesperson of the Yanomami natives in today’s Brazil. His words are crucial to understand the challenges we are facing and how much we still have to learn from those people. It ends with a song dedicated to Bety Cariño, a social activist from Oaxaca brutally murdered by the colonial powers and their hitmen.

    Like so many other things in the small universe of Tropical Diaspora® Records this compilation album is the result of travels and personal connections. In fact, its meaning conveys just that: the creation of human relations based on love and care, understanding, respect and passionate discussions around the topics that move us. Djs Garrincha and Dr. Sócrates do exactly this with a case full of records traveling across the borders of Europe and the Americas. Dj Garrincha’s trips have taken him to meet artists and ignite relations that are meant to last. It can be Chicago, São Paulo, Medellin, Berlin, Barcelona, Olinda or San Juan. We still are committed to add new Diaspora cities into our web of places and people to care about.

    Griot Xamã, the first song of the compilation, consists of two read statements. It begins with a text of André Piruka, the band leader of Höröya, and ends with the speech of the Yanomami Pajé. Höröya is an amazing band from São Paulo composed by Brazilian and African musicians, mainly from West Africa. It represents the acknowledgment of a recent Afro Diaspora that blends with Brazilian Afro traditions. Two worlds are here re-united in the powerful drums (djembe, atabaque, dunduns or cuica) and the Mandeng culture.

    It is followed by the complexity of the Colombian musical world. La Rueda is a band of Colombian emigrants living in Madrid. We have chosen El Rurrú because of the strong use of Gaitas (pipes) and Tambores (drums) from the Colombian Caribbean cost, masterfully mixing African and Native roots with some Spanish influences. If La Rueda heats up the dancefloor, don’t worry, an opportunity to take an almost transcendental break comes just in time.

    Bantunagojêje is many things, and all are named there. It comes from Salvador (Bahia/Brazil), but it could be from West Africa: it is a matter of displacement or Diaspora, as we would say. Sereno is a song of acknowledgment and respect. But, above all, its intensity means to make a stand against banality and spoliation.

    After it, Ska Maria Pastora from Olinda, in the North-East of Brazil, re-ignites the stage with the power of ska horns in the best tradition of The Skatalites. But you have to listen carefully. Because the main influence of the band as in Fanfarra Dominicana is frevo, a musical style that it said to be originated in the Carnival and the movements of the capoeira dancers. The harmonies of Frevo make here their way into Jamaican music.

    The A-side ends with El Santo Golpe from Riverside, California. Fun and joy literally explode in El Ladrón, a song that represents very well all what El Santo Golpe is about. West-African drums combine with Son Jarocho and Garifuna music. We exultantly assist to the fusion of Native, African and Spanish musical elements.If the Latin rhythms performed by El Santo Golpe have infected your soul then you only have to turn the record over.

    The B-side begins with Bando and Los Made in Barcelona. Did you think that afro-latin-rock is possible? Well, you have to listen to the deep groove of the electric guitar of the Puerto Ricans of Bando. Cangrejo is a nostalgic song about the struggling love between people who are doomed to fail.

    Los Made is a Latin combo from many different places. Their music is rooted in the alleys and streets of Barcelona. The song We Are Street bears that urban flavor beyond stereotypes. It speaks of social struggles in a way that pierces your heart.

    With Abeokuta from Recife (Pernambuco/Brazil) we go straight into the Afrobeat. Inspired by Fela Kuti –Abeokuta was his place of birth– the band adds to the Nigerian afrobeat the popular afro-beat found in Pernambuco, so it is Mr.Job. You need to listen to what happens with the drums taken the lead, as they are accompanied by the horns, in order to understand what means to play Afrobeat today.

    Höröya makes its contribution again with Mandin’Groove, an infecting song in which the West-African percussion takes over the dancefloor.

    The record ends with Riosentí, a duo of musical nomads from Mexico and Argentina. They are the authors of Canción para Cariño, dedicated to the social leader from Oaxaca Bety Cariño. Here, Riosentí has been able to blend the best of protest songs with traditional rhythms and a modern urban groove. It is a cry, but never in vain.

    Includes unlimited streaming of Tropical Diaspora #1 via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
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1.

about

The Tree of Forgetfulness and the Door of No Return

We are very happy to announce our first compilation on vinyl coming out this autumn. The Volume 1 introduces many independent bands and artists with strong social messages and songs that make people think and dance.

This socially responsible dancefloor compilation starts with the words of Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, the shaman and spokesperson of the Yanomami natives in today’s Brazil. His words are crucial to understand the challenges we are facing and how much we still have to learn from those people. It ends with a song dedicated to Bety Cariño, a social activist from Oaxaca brutally murdered by the colonial powers and their hitmen.

Like so many other things in the small universe of Tropical Diaspora® Records this compilation album is the result of travels and personal connections. In fact, its meaning conveys just that: the creation of human relations based on love and care, understanding, respect and passionate discussions around the topics that move us. Djs Garrincha and Dr. Sócrates do exactly this with a case full of records traveling across the borders of Europe and the Americas. Dj Garrincha’s trips have taken him to meet artists and ignite relations that are meant to last. It can be Chicago, São Paulo, Medellin, Berlin, Barcelona, Olinda or San Juan. We still are committed to add new Diaspora cities into our web of places and people to care about.

Griot Xamã, the first song of the compilation, consists of two read statements. It begins with a text of André Piruka, the band leader of Höröya, and ends with the speech of the Yanomami Pajé. Höröya is an amazing band from São Paulo composed by Brazilian and African musicians, mainly from West Africa. It represents the acknowledgment of a recent Afro Diaspora that blends with Brazilian Afro traditions. Two worlds are here re-united in the powerful drums (djembe, atabaque, dunduns or cuica) and the Mandeng culture.

It is followed by the complexity of the Colombian musical world. La Rueda is a band of Colombian emigrants living in Madrid. We have chosen El Rurrú because of the strong use of Gaitas (pipes) and Tambores (drums) from the Colombian Caribbean cost, masterfully mixing African and Native roots with some Spanish influences. If La Rueda heats up the dancefloor, don’t worry, an opportunity to take an almost transcendental break comes just in time.

Bantunagojêje is many things, and all are named there. It comes from Salvador (Bahia/Brazil), but it could be from West Africa: it is a matter of displacement or Diaspora, as we would say. Sereno is a song of acknowledgment and respect. But, above all, its intensity means to make a stand against banality and spoliation.

After it, Ska Maria Pastora from Olinda, in the North-East of Brazil, re-ignites the stage with the power of ska horns in the best tradition of The Skatalites. But you have to listen carefully. Because the main influence of the band as in Fanfarra Dominicana is frevo, a musical style that it said to be originated in the Carnival and the movements of the capoeira dancers. The harmonies of Frevo make here their way into Jamaican music.

The A-side ends with El Santo Golpe from Riverside, California. Fun and joy literally explode in El Ladrón, a song that represents very well all what El Santo Golpe is about. West-African drums combine with Son Jarocho and Garifuna music. We exultantly assist to the fusion of Native, African and Spanish musical elements.If the Latin rhythms performed by El Santo Golpe have infected your soul then you only have to turn the record over.

The B-side begins with Bando and Los Made in Barcelona. Did you think that afro-latin-rock is possible? Well, you have to listen to the deep groove of the electric guitar of the Puerto Ricans of Bando. Cangrejo is a nostalgic song about the struggling love between people who are doomed to fail.

Los Made is a Latin combo from many different places. Their music is rooted in the alleys and streets of Barcelona. The song We Are Street bears that urban flavor beyond stereotypes. It speaks of social struggles in a way that pierces your heart.

With Abeokuta from Recife (Pernambuco/Brazil) we go straight into the Afrobeat. Inspired by Fela Kuti –Abeokuta was his place of birth– the band adds to the Nigerian afrobeat the popular afro-beat found in Pernambuco, so it is Mr.Job. You need to listen to what happens with the drums taken the lead, as they are accompanied by the horns, in order to understand what means to play Afrobeat today.

Höröya makes its contribution again with Mandin’Groove, an infecting song in which the West-African percussion takes over the dancefloor.

The record ends with Riosentí, a duo of musical nomads from Mexico and Argentina. They are the authors of Canción para Cariño, dedicated to the social leader from Oaxaca Bety Cariño. Here, Riosentí has been able to blend the best of protest songs with traditional rhythms and a modern urban groove. It is a cry, but never in vain.

Featuring: Höröyá, La Rueda, Bantunagojêje, Ska Maria Pastora, EL Santo Golpe, Bando, Los Made In Barcelona, Abeokuta, Riosentí

credits

released October 5, 2019

Tropical Diaspora® Records compilation volume 1 is available for pre-orders and will be released in a limited edition for vinyl and cassette. This record is featuring 9 independent bands from all over the world with a total of 10 tracks. The record is transparent and contain a inner sleeve with the song lyrics plus a poster. This record is a powerful network of remembrances. It gives voice to the daughters and sons of the slave trade. It is testimony of how African slaves kept their cultures and history alive giving birth to one of the most amazing cultural experiments of humankind.

Tropical Diaspora® Compilation Vol.1

We are featuring this artists and bands, click on it to read more:

Höröyá – Brazil (São Paulo)
La Rueda – Colombia (Madrid)
Bantunagojêje – Brazil (Berlin)
Ska Maria Pastora – Brazil (Olinda)
El Santo Golpe – USA (California)
Bando – Puerto Rico (San Juan)
Made In Barcelona – Barceloneta (Barcelona)
Abeokuta – Brazil (Recife)
Riosentí – Germany (Mexico / Argentina)

Official release of will be the 05.10.2019 in Paris at the Indy Label Market

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Tropical Diaspora Records Estd. Berlin Berlin, Germany

Tropical Diaspora® Records is the Vehicle for Emancipation of cliches, languages, business models… in short, the colonial mentality. We use vinyl records as tool and instrument for empowering artists and communities to determine their history and destiny. This is what Tropical Diaspora Records is and always will be. ... more

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